Intensive Counseling, State Data and Incentives- What’s new

September 29th, 2010 by MorganDowney Leave a reply »

September 29, 2010

Look AHEAD, an NIH funded long term study of life style intervention on weight and cardiovascular risk factors has released its 4 year findings. One arm of the study received intensive lifestyle counseling; the other arm received usual dietary counseling. Averaged across the four years, body weight was reduced in the intensive group by 6.5% compared to 0 .88%, along with improvements in fitness, hemoglobin A1c, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, HDL cholesterol and triglycerides. Some of the gains decreased over time as one would expect but were still significantly better at the four year follow-up. See, Arch Intern Med — Abstract: Long-term Effects of a Lifestyle Intervention on Weight and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Four-Year Results of the Look AHEAD Trial, September 27, 2010, The Look AHEAD Research Group 170

George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services has released new data on obesity coverage under the Medicaid program, state employee coverage and mandates for obesity coverage, as well as their new study on the personal costs due to obesity. See Health Policy | School of Public Health and Health Services | George Washington University

The American College of Physicians has released a paper, Ethical Considerations for the Use of Patient Incentives to Promote Personal Responsibility for Health: West Virginia Medicaid and Beyond. The paper addresses evolving wellness programs which involve “incentives” or “penalties,” depending on one’s point of view. The paper cautions, “”motivating behavior change is much more complex than can be accomplished with a single strategy and requires both an individual commitment to health as well as societal collaboration to eliminate barriers. The College adds that such programs “must be designed to allocate benefits equitably;  must not include penalties.”    See,       http://www.acponline.org/running_practice/ethics/issues/policy/personal_incentives.pdf