Archive for January, 2017

Repealing Obamacare: read the fine print

January 10th, 2017

Washington is preparing a re-start of the 8 year battle over Obamacare, formally the Affordable Care Act (ACA). With Republicans in control of both Congress and the White House, it is widely expected that they will have to live up to their promise to repeal the law. But repeal is not as easy as it sounds. The ACA is a large and complicated law embedded not only in the health care system but more widely in American life.

Many aspects of the repeal effort will be hotly debated in the near future. Behind the headlines will be the details, where, as we know, the devils reside. Take two important issues: coverage of persons with pre-existing conditions and employer wellness programs. President-elect Trump and many Republicans have promised to continue the ACA’s provision that pre-existing conditions cannot be used as a basis for denial of insurance coverage. But the ACA’s provision has a second element: insurers cannot charge more for covering persons with pre-existing conditions. (Obesity and related conditions are considered “pre-existing” conditions.) However, a proposed repeal bill developed by the House of Representative Republican Study group would provide coverage for pre-existing through state high-risk insurance pools. Premiums could go up to 200% of the average premium charged in a state. Clearly, such premiums would make policies unaffordable by many with chronic health conditions, especially without subsidies for low-income Americans as provided for in the ACA.

If one took repealing the ACA literally, we could assume that its provisions relating to employer wellness programs would be eliminated. If repealed, the maximum reward/penalty would revert from 30% of the total employer-employee to the previous level of 20% established by ERISA. Wrong.  Under the Republican Study Group, the maximum would actually increase to 50% from 30%.  The Republican Study Group may be one of the more conservative proposals we will see but it provides an important lesson: read the fine print.