Are Persons with Obesity Different?

September 27th, 2011 No comments »

Are persons with obesity different? The question is fraught with implications. Much of obesity policy is premised on the assumption that persons with obesity are just like normal weight persons but with less self-control. The assumption is that education and awareness will overcome their lack of awareness and result in more self-control, just like normal weight persons. Of course, a genetic basis for obesity is counter to this assumption. How does this genetic pre-disposition express itself? Two recent studies may provide insights. In one, overweight persons show a higher capacity for storing fats but a lower capacity for ridding themselves of them, using the radioactive isotope carbon-14. Cell dysfunction linked to obesity and metabolic disorders | ScienceBlog.com

 In another study, the brains of persons with obesity were found to create a greater desire for high-calorie foods than normal-weight subjects which would explain why people who become overweight tend to remain overweight. Study: Obese people’s brains may crave high-calorie foods – USATODAY.com

Brain affected in obese adolescents with type 2 diabetes

June 23rd, 2011 No comments »

Adults with type 2 diabetes have reduced hippocampal and frontal lobe volumes in the brain. A new study looked at obese adolescents with type 2 diabetes compared to obese adolescents without type 2 diabetes and found significantly reduced hippocampal and prefrontal volumes and higher rates of global cerebral atrophy and HbA1c. This indicates that brain integrity it negatively impacted by type 2 diabetes long before the onset of overt macrovascular disease. The authors called for more aggressive treatment of obesity and diabetes in children and adolescents Obese Adolescents with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Ha… [Neurosci Med. 2011] – PubMed result

Similarities Between Obesity and Addiction

April 11th, 2010 No comments »

March 31, 2010
Department of Health and Human Services addresses similarities between obesity and addiction. Common Mechanisms of Drug Abuse and Obesity, March 28, 2010 News Release – National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Brain and Gut

September 26th, 2009 No comments »

Frequently, when persons with obesity are depicted in the media, they are headless forms (butts and guts I call the pictures) for we think of obesity in terms of body fat accumulation. But obesity really starts in the brain with multiple signals coming from the gut. Adipose tissue itself generates hormones such as leptin and adiponectin; the GI tract generates ghrelin which signals the brain to initiate feeding . Other products which may stimulate feeding or signal time to stop feeding include leptin, insulin neuropeptide Y among others. Parts of the brain involved are the hypothalamus, the dorsal vagal complex and the reward system.

Researchers now appreciate that food acquisition, preparation, and intake are the result of a several physical signals by which the body communicates to the brain that it is hungry and needs to start feeding or full and needs to stop. MD

Brain

So, just how does the body regulate its weight? The body needs to get its weight just right. Too little nourishment and the body becomes ill and cannot reproduce. Too much also a problem. Look at the precision needed. If one ate the recommended 2,200 calories per day (and a lot eat a lot more) they would consumer 792,000 calories in a year. If they are just 1% more calories, they would add 2 pounds per year or 20 pounds over a decade of life. That’s just an extra 22 calories a day – about half a lower fat Oreo cookie. 100 extra calories a day – about 2/3 of 1 ounce of potato chips – can result in a 5-pound weight gain a year. To keep within these narrow boundaries of health body weight, our bodies have evolved a sophisticated, redundant system to gauge its body weight and when to feed and when to stop feeding.

The four parts of this system are (1) the nervous system which connects the brain, gut and adipose tissue, (2) hormones, including those made by fat cells, (3) neuropeptides which act as messengers and (4) messenger molecules in the immune system called cytokines. These molecules control body weight. The pancreas and adipose tissue make leptin, insulin, adiponectin, visfatin and resistin. The brain makes NPY, melanocortin and cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript called CART. The stomach makes ghrelin, PYY and CCK.

The process can begin before you eat. Even the sight, smell or thought of food can trigger the “cephalic response.” This can start the production of insulin. Ghrelin increases the desire to eat. PYY can signal an end to feeding. Under stress, the sympathetic nervous system is activiated. This promotes storage of fat, decreases metabolism and promotes insulin resistance. Weight increases and metabolism slows down when this system is activated. The key hormone is insulin which is produced in the pancreas. It is designed to use carbohydrates or store them for later use.

The signals to the brain come from both the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system Central and peripheral regulation of food intake a…[Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008] – PubMed Result

They appear to converge in the hypothalamus region of the brain.Hypothalamic control of energy balance. [Curr Drug Targets. 2004] – PubMed Result

No fewer than ten possible automatic and largely uncontrollable responses to the modern food environment have been proposed to understand why people can consume more calories than they need without their full awareness or control over their behavior Neurophysiological pathways to obesity: below awar…[Diabetes. 2008] – PubMed Result

Obese individuals appear to respond differently to food visual cues Obese adults have visual attention bias for food c…[Int J Obes (Lond). 2009] – PubMed Result

Obese and overweight persons appear to have lower brain volume Brain structure and obesity. [Hum Brain Mapp. 2009] – PubMed Result

Gut Hormones

Leptin has been identified as one of the most powerful hormones involved in appetite regulation. Appetite control and energy balance regulation in …[Int J Obes (Lond). 2009] – PubMed Result Now, newer techniques like brain imaging can be used to understand the role the brain and central nervous system play in eating behaviours.Leptin regulates striatal regions and human eating…[Science. 2007] – PubMed Result and Neuroimaging and obesity: mapping the brain respon…[Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2002] – PubMed Result

Another class of signaling substances are neuropeptides. Orexin is one of several currently of interest to scientists. Orexin/Hypocretin: a neuropeptide at the interface…[Pharmacol Rev. 2009] – PubMed Result and Orexin neuronal circuitry: role in the regulation …[Front Neuroendocrinol. 2008] – PubMed Result

Chronic stress and obesity: a new view of “comfort…[Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003] – PubMed Result

Maternal corticotropin-releasing hormone levels du…[Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006] – PubMed Result

The role of gut hormones in the regulation of body…[Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2009] – PubMed Result

Gut hormones: a weight off your mind. [J Neuroendocrinol. 2008] – PubMed Result

Gut hormones and appetite control. [Gastroenterology. 2007] – PubMed Result

Cord blood leptin and adiponectin as predictors of…[Pediatrics. 2009] – PubMed Result

The leptin/adiponectin ratio in mid-infancy correl…[J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2008] – PubMed Result

As research progresses, new theories of evolutionary development are looking at Build-ups in the supply chain of the brain: on the…[Front Neuroenergetics. 2009] – PubMed Result

Ghrelin is a gut hormone which appears to be very significant and is the subject of much research.Lean Mean Fat Reducing “Ghrelin” Machine: Hypothal…[Neuropharmacology. 2009] – PubMed Result

Appetite

Viewing photographs of fattening foods, compared to non-food objects can result in greater activiation in parts of the brain. Activation in brain energy regulation and reward c…[Int J Obes (Lond). 2009] – PubMed Result In one study, obese women had greater brain activity in response to pictures of high fat foods than did non-obese women. Widespread reward-system activation in obese women…[Neuroimage. 2008] – PubMed Result and Effective connectivity of a reward network in obes…[Brain Res Bull. 2009] – PubMed Result

Gut peptides and the regulation of appetite. [Obes Rev. 2006] – PubMed Result