Posts Tagged ‘Barack Obama’

HEALTH CARE REFORM

January 3rd, 2011

January 21, 2011

As part of health care reform legislation, the Department of Health and Human Services was tasked with reporting to Congress on the status of obesity prevention efforts in Medicaid program. Here is their announcement of sending the report to Congress and a link to the full report. HHS Report to Congress on Availability and Status of Obesity Prevention Programs in Medicaid – Kaiser Health Reform

January 18, 2011

A new federal study estimates 129 million Americans , 1 out of 2, have a pre-existing condition which could disqualify them from obtaining insurance coverage. Obesity is one of the pre-existing conditions. At Risk: Pre-Existing Conditions Could Affect 1 in 2 Americans: | HealthCare.gov The study is part of the debate over repeal of President Obama’s signature health care reform law. The law guarantees health insurance to persons with pre-existing conditions. The vote to repeal, expected in a day or two, is not likely to be approved by the Senate or signed into law by the President.

2011 will be a critical year in implementing the Health Care Reform Legislation, the Affordable Care Act. About the Affordable Care Act | HealthCare.gov  Unless, of course, it is repealed or the courts throw all or part of the milestone legislation out. In any event, how critical pieces of the legislation affecting obesity will be implemented is important and we will follow it here.

Coming, 2011              The Food and Drug Administration isexpected                    to   finalize rules for chain restaurants to provide calorie information on their menu offerings.

January 3, 2011           Medicare beneficiaries will get the “Welcome to Medicare” physical without cost sharing. An annual Wellness visit will be covered with no cost sharing. Physicians or the health team will take height, weight, waist circumference, and blood pressure. A health risk assessment will also be provided. Preventive services of the USPSTF will be covered with no cost sharing. (It is our understanding that Medicare still does not cover intensive behavioral counseling for obesity.)

January 1, 2010           Medicare will boost primary care reimbursement to keep doctors and nurses working in primary care as the expected numbers of persons now with insurance coverage will surely increase.

September 23, 2010    New group and individual plans must cover services recommended by the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) which includes intensive behavioral counseling of adults on obesity. Screening for Obesity in Adults: Recommendations and Rationale These services must be provided without applying copayments or coinsurance for in-network services. Cost sharing can be applied to out-of-network providers.

Interim final rules are issued to allow children up to age 26 to stay on a parent’s health insurance plan. Dependent Coverage of Children Who Have Not Attained Age 26

 Also, new rules governing appeals of claim denials, including independent reviewers go into effect. Appealing Health Plan Decisions under the Affordable Care Act | HealthCare.gov

July 1, 2020                 Persons without health insurance due to pre-existing conditions can obtain health insurance through their state government or the federal government. Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP) under the Affordable Care Act | HealthCare.gov

Insurance is in effect until 2014 when state insurance exchanges will be operational.

Follow Health Care Reform implementation at these websites:

Department of Health and Human Services   Home | HealthCare.gov

HHS Office of Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight  Regulations and Guidance

Department of Labor Affordable Care Act

Internal Revenue Service Affordable Care Act Tax Provisions  and Affordable Care Act of 2010: News Releases, Multimedia and Legal Guidance

Other:   Excellent blog on the ACA implementation from Timothy Jost Implementing Health Reform: Little-Noticed But Important Guidances – Health Affairs Blog

The End of Summer

October 4th, 2009

September 22, 2009, 5:18 EDT

Thank Goodness. The mean summer of 2009 is finally over. Not only did we see an ugly side of America in the town hall meetings across the country and observe a Congressman insult the President of the United States in a joint session of Congress, it was mean season for persons with obesity.

Alabama has decided to impose a tax on overweight state employees; President Obama’s nominee for Surgeon General was attacked for her weight; the American Medical Association adopted as official policy that persons with obesity should not be eligible for disability payments and the CEO of the Cleveland Clinic, Dr. Toby Cosgrove, told his people to stop hiring overweight persons.

Dr. Cosgrove is a major leader in health care and in the health care reform debate. No doubt he sees the Cleveland Clinic, which already bars smokers from employment, as a leader not only in Cuyahoga County, Ohio but in the nation as well. Good solutions to the obesity epidemic? Make the overweight unemployed so they can’t get health insurance or disability payments if they are disabled? How does a leader like Dr. Cosgrove believe overweight/obese people will live? How will they preserve their families? Pay the rent? Clothe the kids? Not enough people unemployed in Ohio?

As reported by the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Cosgrove is slyly honing his message, trying to tamp down ire from obesity advocates while sending a clear signal to everyone at Cleveland Clinic: the boss doesn’t want to hire fat people. But there is another reason: The Cleveland Clinic is launching a for-profit “wellness” program and this attack on obese people keeps Cosgrove in the limelight. Does Cleveland Clinic’s Toby Cosgrove really hate fat people? : MedCity News Perhaps Dr. Cosgrove’s business strategy is to scare Clevelanders into paying to go to his ‘wellness’ clinic. Cleveland Clinic’s Lifestyle 180 promotes better health through better living | Health and Fitness – cleveland.com – – cleveland.com

Is the Cleveland Clinic plan mere discrimination? Perhaps we underestimate the good Dr. Cosgrove. Perhaps it is just a way to gin up business on the income side while cutting personnel expenses. What great health care reform!

The summer also brought the deaths of two Kennedys – Senator Ted Kennedy and his sister, Eunice Kennedy Shriver. We were in Massachusetts at the time of Eunice’s funeral and watched it on television and then watched Senator Kennedy’s a few weeks later. It doesn’t take much to see how dedicated these two were to the elimination of discrimination in whatever its form…persons with mental illness, persons denied health care, gays, women and the disabled. Senator Kennedy said, “Every American should have the opportunity to receive a quality education, a job that respects their dignity and protects their safety, and health care that does not condemn those whose health is impaired to a lifetime of poverty and lost opportunity.” Ending Segregation and Discrimination Against Disabled Americans | In His Own Words | Edward M. Kennedy

Where Dr. Cosgrove and the AMA would throw the sickest Americans under the bus, the Kennedys would pick them up. We can’t say how the intentional discrimination promoted by the good Dr. Cosgrove will work out. We do know he’s no Ted Kennedy. Thank Goodness the summer is over.

The Messenger or the Message? Part I

September 27th, 2009

July 30, 2009 :: By Morgan Downey

The ongoing furor over President Obama’s pick of Dr. Regina Benjamin as the next Surgeon General is to prejudice and obesity as the Harvard Professor Henry Lewis Gates’s arrest by Sergeant James Crowley in Cambridge, Mass., is to prejudice and race.

In both cases, it seems that a great magnet pulls part of the population to one side and part to the other side. After positions are staked out, we sort out the facts to fix our positions or, in some rare cases, to actually change our mind.

Dr. Benjamin’s opponents say that an overweight person cannot carry the message of healthy living. An ABC News report Is Regina Bejamin, Surgeon General Nominee, Overweight? – ABC News quotes former editor of the New England Journal of Medicine Dr. Marcia Angell stating, “I think it (the Surgeon General nominee’s weight) is an issue but then the president is said to still smoke cigarettes. It tends to undermine her credibility. We don’t know how much she weighs and just looking at her I would not say she is grotesquely obese or even overweight enough to affect her health. But I do think at a time when a lot of public health concern is about the national epidemic of obesity, having a surgeon general who is noticeably overweight raises questions in people’s minds.”“Grotesquely obese?” Is this not the crassest view of obesity that it offends my sense of beauty? And, is Dr. Angell aware of the scientific literature that even modest amounts of overweight may lead to increased risk of disease such as hypertension and type 2 diabetes? Does this mean that the Surgeon General cannot be a disabled person or someone with HIV/AIDS? I doubt she would say that.

The ABC NEWS piece neglected to mention Dr. Angell’s controversial editorial of January 1998 in the New England Journal of Medicine. In this editorial, Dr. Angell observed that weight loss efforts (which she acknowledged were nearly impossible) were “virtually ubiquitous among adolescent girls and young women. In middle schools and colleges throughout the country, girls who are far from overweight believe they are obese, or “gross.” (No citations in original). While dissing weight-loss efforts and physician counseling, she advised physicians, “Until we have better data about the risks of being overweight and the benefits and risks of trying to lose weight, we should remember that the cure for obesity may be worse than the condition.” Really, Dr. Angell? Eleven years later with obesity rates going through the roof, do you want to revisit that advice? Contrary to her statements to ABC NEWS, Dr. Angell closed by stating, “Finally, doctors should do their part to help end discrimination against overweight people in schools and workplaces. We should also speak out against the public’s excessive infatuation with being thin and the extreme, expensive, and potentially dangerous measures taken to attain that goal.”

Dr. Angell’s editorial produced strong reactions from obesity experts. William Dietz, MD and director of the CDC Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity wrote prophetically,

“You endorse the prevention of obesity but suggest that physicians “should provide advice if an overweight patient asks for help in planning a weight-loss program and recommend weight loss if a patient is suffering from health problems that can be ameliorated by weight loss.” This passive approach will not prevent weight gain in those at risk, nor will it prevent further weight gain in those who are already overweight. Furthermore, the rapid increase in body-mass index in the U.S. population over the past 15 years will most likely continue unabated if this passive approach is used.

The Massachusetts Medical Society Committee on Nutrition went on record opposing Dr. Angell’s editorial. In addition, the Committee took issue with an interview Dr. Angell gave to the Wall Street Journal on Feb. 9, 1998, in which she stated that some people “just like to eat — and in that case, it (obesity) is no more of a disease than bank robbery is a disease.” The Committee stated that such broad, unsubstantiated statements are inaccurate, inappropriate and irresponsible. The committee, whose members are physicians with extensive training and expertise in the fields of nutrition and obesity treatment, stands firm in its belief that obesity cannot be blamed solely on lack of willpower to control eating and activity. It also results from genetic factors affecting energy metabolism and eating behavior. Statements that belittle the life-threatening disease of obesity make a mockery of the plight of obese patients and undermine the medical profession.

Doctor Angell, you should take your own advice and unequivocally support Dr. Benjamin as Surgeon General regardless of her BMI.

A Diet for the New Administration

September 27th, 2009

December 30, 2008

By Morgan Downey

At this time of year, millions of Americans are hoping the new Administration will solve our seemingly intractable problems at home and abroad. Millions are also hoping to lose weight in the New Year. The two are not unrelated.

Over the past three decades, obesity has increased among all segments of the population, in the United States and abroad. Obesity is now recognized as the fuel behind many major health problems from cancer to diabetes to heart disease, and a significant cause of increasing health care utilization and health care costs.

While this recognition has increased among both Republicans and Democrats (for the first time, both parties recognized obesity in their 2008 party platforms), changing public policy has not caught up with the problem. Under President George W. Bush, Medicare did undo its policy that obesity was not a disease and did expand coverage of surgery for the treatment of obesity. There have been modest increases in the research and prevention budgets at the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But by and large, the efforts of the last eight years have been largely educational: tell people they should lose weight, eat more nutritiously, and exercise more.

Duh! We get it. And it doesn’t work. Frankly, other than bariatric surgery, nothing works very well to lose significant amounts for a long period of time. There simply is not one ‘fix’ that will reverse this disturbing trend.

So here is some advice to the incoming Administration. It should be noted that many appointees named so far have a solid exposure to obesity from a public policy perspective, including former Senator Tom Daschle, nominee for Secretary of Health and Human Services, Peter Orszag, named to head the Office of Management and Budget, Governor Bill Richardson, nominated for Secretary of Commerce, and Melody Barnes, incoming chief of domestic policy at the White House.

Universal health insurance is often put forward as the panacea for all ills. However, Democrats may have to learn that expanding health insurance coverage alone does not translate to a healthier population, especially if obesity continues to increase among children and adolescents. Truth be told, we do not have adequate medical interventions to affect the rates of obesity and its effects. So, if we do not know how to truly prevent obesity or create a long term treatment, what should a new Administration do? Basically, it should focus on how to create the conditions where it is more likely than not that we will find effective strategies for prevention and treatment in the future.

  1. Being a role model is not enough. It’s been noted that George Bush and Barack Obama share a passion for physical activity. Unfortunately, the habits of the chief executive do not translate to population changes. And then there is the smoking thing. Being a role model is not an excuse for inadequate policies.
  2. Make someone responsible for obesity policy development. Right now there is no one tasked at the upper levels of the U.S. Government with dealing with obesity. True, periodically the heads of different agencies give a speech, start a new website or create a new task force but little happens because so many do so little with scant coordination.
  3. Prepare to spend some money. For one of the most significant health problems in the country, the federal government spends vastly less than on obesity than other conditions. Research, prevention and treatment costs for diabetes and heart disease, to name but two, swamp comparable figures for obesity. The federal government is spending more on getting TV converters boxes in US homes than the entire NIH research budget on obesity.
  4. Do not just focus on childhood obesity. While childhood obesity is critical, remember that the population between 7 and 16 spans only 9 years out of a lifetime. Look at obesity over the lifetime and look for relevant interventions. Support childhood prevention programs but require that they have a competent evaluation method so we will know what is working and what is not.
  5. Do focus on research. Perhaps 90% of what we know about obesity has been learned since the discovery of leptin in 1994. Too many people believe that we know everything we need to know about obesity and do not need any more research. That’s not true. A great deal is known but there are many more questions than answers. Scientific credibility on issues around body weight is sorely needed. Every hour on television another weight loss program or product is hyped as being based on doctor’s advice or scientific study. What can help on both fronts is for the Administration to create a National Institute of Obesity Research at the National Institutes of Health. A new entity like this can reenergize researchers on obesity, can more closely coordinate the many disparate programs across NIH, provide leadership to other federal agencies, states and local governments and provide much needed focus on the social and economic impacts of obesity. Furthermore, a director who is articulate can help lead policymakers and the public away from harmful and dangerous products and keep a focus on developing effective interventions. The NIH bureaucracy will oppose “disease specific” research but their interests should not trump the public health needs and the best use of taxpayer dollars.
  6. As part of your health care reform package, remove the bias against drugs for weight loss in the Medicaid statute and change the exclusion of these drugs under Medicare Part D. Then have the Food and Drug Administration revisit its risk/benefit views of drugs to treat obesity. There are few fans of pharmaceutical companies in a Democratic Congress and Administration and there are even fewer who favor drugs to treat obesity. Nonetheless, there is a huge treatment gap. We have more and more effective surgical options, one over-the-counter FDA approved pill, a couple of tried medicines, commercial plans and self-help. What we do not have are the drug treatment options we have for high cholesterol, hypertension or diabetes. Recently, major pharmaceutical companies such as Merck, Pfizer, Solvay and Sanofi-Aventis have dropped or cut back on their programs to develop drugs for obesity. There are two reasons. First, insurance companies will not reimburse for most obesity treatments, including counseling, drugs and surgery. For the pharmaceutical industry, it just did not make economic sense to invest in drugs which were not going to be reimbursed. This is where leadership by Medicaid and Medicare is critical. If these programs support obesity products, private insurance may follow. This is in the government’s long term interest because insurers can avoid treating or preventing obesity knowing that the big effects, like diabetes and heart disease will not be seen until later in life, when Medicare will become the payor. Second, many involved in obesity drug development feel, rightly or wrongly, that the Food and Drug Administration is so risk-averse that they simply cannot afford the long and expensive trials necessary to meet the rising bar of safety. A National Institute of Obesity Research can help shape clinical trials needed by the FDA and speed the process along.
  7. Look to multiply your opportunities. For example, you can use the public works part of the economic stimulus package to construct new gyms in schools, sidewalks, playgrounds, green spaces and biking/walking trails to encourage more physical activity.
  8. Let the states experiment with taxes and proposals like displaying caloric content in restaurants. Vending machines, non-diet soft drinks, high-fat foods have all come under fire in recent years for contributing to the obesity epidemic. The problem is that these products still only contribute a fraction to an individual’s total caloric intake. But no one is sure that they won’t be replaced by other calories. Likewise, there will be voices to restrict food advertising to children through the federal government’s regulatory powers. Use your National Institute of Obesity Research to design evaluation studies so that there is an objective review to see if these policies will work.
  9. Take some leadership internationally. The United States has a long history of involvement in global health issues, such as HIV/AIDs. However, very little is done on the federal level to learn from other countries’ experiences and to help shape global patterns of eating and physical activity.
  10. Avoid the single fix ideas. The obesity field is full of good advice and scant evidence. Focusing on a single fix, such a TV advertising, agricultural subsidies or sweetened beverage may consume a great amount of political resources without producing the outcome you seek.

The obesity epidemic is more likely than not to continue to grow over the next four to eight years. However, the new Administration can position the United States for meaningful change if it takes its time and devotes attention to organizing the effort. With any luck, we can make future New Year’s resolutions more likely to be successful.

Resources

September 27th, 2009

Follow the debate on obesity as a disease at Obesity – ProCon.org

USDA MyPyramid MyPyramid.gov – United States Department of Agriculture – Home

Nutrition Fact Sheets from the American Dietetic Association Nutrition Fact Sheets

Diabetes Research Summaries from the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Research Summaries – Overweight, Obesity & Weight Loss – American Diabetes Association

Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations from the American Heart Association http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=851

Disease Management Association of America obesity resource page Welcome to the Obesity Resource Center

The Obesity Action Coalition’s mission is to assist persons trying to lose weight and facing discrimination in insurance and the workplace. OAC ­ Obesity Action Coalition

NCCOR | National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research

This is a fun site on the First Family’s food issues: Obama Foodorama

Here’s a toolkit for parents and caregivers of adolescents on eating and activity pattern changes BodyWorks – A Toolkit for Healthy Teens and Strong Families

We Can is a program of the National Institutes of Health focused on childhood obesity We Can! is an education program to prevent childhood overweight

The Campaign to End Obesity

Latest News

September 27th, 2009

October 21, 2009

FDA plans revision to nutrition label. FDA seeks to improve nutrition labeling on food products – washingtonpost.com

October 20, 2009

Women with obesity at risk for in vitro fertilization failure The Press Association: Obesity cuts IVF success – study

October 19,2009

Can anyone get insurance? Now an underweight girl is excluded. Underweight Girl Denied Insurance Coverage – Denver News Story – KMGH Denver

October 18, 2009

Washington Post columnist Robin Givhan address the Fashion industry and thinness in the culture.Robin Givhan on Fashion: Size of the Model vs. Size of the Customer – washingtonpost.com

Great Idea: solve obesity by making people taller. Idea Lab – Should a War on Shortness Be One of the Goals of Health Care Reform? – NYTimes.com

October 17, 2009

NYT reports on prospects for new drugs for obesity Arena, Orexigen and Vivus Are Chasing an Effective Diet Drug – NYTimes.com

Why can’t CDC find obese swine flu patients? Pneumonia, Susceptibility of Young Among Traits of Swine Flu – washingtonpost.com

October 15, 2009             

Family Physicians Ink deal with Coke Family Doctors Sign Educational Deal With Coca-Cola – NPR Health Blog : NPR

October 14, 2009

First Lady Michelle Obama tackles childhood obesity Michelle Obama’s Weight Loss Tips: Watch TV Standing Up — Politics Daily

North Carolina Plan criticized Obesity penalty isn’t fair or effective – Columnists/Blogs – News & Observer

Ralph Lauren model fired for being too fat Photoshopped Ralph Lauren Model Filippa Hamilton Fired For Being Fat – WPIX

Dr. Bernandine Healy hits punitive steps against the obese The Obesity Epidemic Isn’t Just About Willpower – US News and World Report

October 13, 2009

Candidate’s weight becomes important issue in NJ Governor Race Is Chris Christie Too Fat to Be the Next Governor of New Jersey? – The Gaggle Blog – Newsweek.com

October 12, 2009

Infant denied health care for  pre-existing conditions Why we need health-care reform: ‘Obese’ infant denied insurance!

Colorado Insurer caves The Associated Press: Colo. insurer changes course on fat infants

Baby denied health insurance for obesity as pre-existing condition 17-Pound, 4-Month-Old Baby Denied Health Insurance for Being Too Fat – Children’s Health – FOXNews.com

October 9, 2009

Groups push back on premium increases in Senate Finance Bill If Your Waistline Grows, Should Your Premiums, Too? – Prescriptions Blog – NYTimes.com

October 8, 2009

Corzine attacked as bigot Is Corzine A Bigot? | The New Republic

October 7, 2009

Physicians lead the way in treating obesity Doctors join fight against obesity – USATODAY.com

NJ Governor Corzine accused of attacking opponents weight Corzine Points Spotlight at Christie’s Weight – NYTimes.com

North Carolina to punish overweight state workers North Carolina state health plan to penalize smokers, obese

October 6, 2009

Study showing restaurant calorie labeling doesn’t change habits sure to add fuel to labeling debate Calorie Postings Don’t Change Habits, Study Finds – NYTimes.com

October 2, 2009,

New York Board of Education bans bake sales Bake Sales Are Banned in New York Schools – NYTimes.com

October 1, 2009

After 20 years USDA program for Women Infants and Children adds fruits and vegetables to its voucher program WIC nutrition program expands to cover fruits, vegetables — latimes.com

September 17, 2009 NEJM publishes study on taxing sugar-sweetened beverages NEJM — The Public Health and Economic Benefits of Taxing Sugar-Sweetened Beverages

September 11, 2009

Indiana Court allows workers comp coverage of bariatric surgery Indiana Appeals Court Affirms Work Comp Coverage for Obesity Surgery

September 9, 2009

STOP Obesity Alliance presents health care reform proposals Curbing Obesity Epidemic Key to Health Care Reform: Experts – US News and World Report See 16th and 17th U.S. Surgeons General, STOP Obesity Alliance Announce America has Reached Tipping Point on Obesity, Call for Direct Action – STOP Obesity Alliance

September 1, 2009

Institute of Medicine issues recommendations for combating childhood obesity Report maps out solutions to child obesity – USATODAY.com

USDA announces child nutrition grants Release No. 0416.09

More employers trying financial incentives As Federal Healthcare Reform Debate Continues, New Survey Reveals More Companies Turn to Financial Rewards to Tackle Soaring Employee Healthcare Costs

August 31, 2009

New target for therapies identified Study may lead to new obesity therapies – UPI.com

New York City targets sugar-sweetened drinks New Salvo in City’s War on Sugary Drinks – City Room Blog – NYTimes.com

Risk of infant mortality rises with mother’s weight Mom’s obesity tied to higher infant mortality

August 30, 2009

Obesity linked to swine flu deaths Obesity linked to swine flu deaths | World news | The Observer

August 27, 2009

Extreme obesity shortens lives by 12 years Extreme obesity can shorten people’s lives by 12 years – USATODAY.com

New drug claims ability to fight obesity and diabetes New fat-fighting drug has anti-diabetes action too | Health | Reuters

Obesity deniers come out http://www.newsweek.com/id/213807

August 24, 2009

American Heart Association raises alarm about sugar Heart Association recommends limits on added sugars – White Coat Notes – Boston.com

Interesting graph plots out contribution of obesity, age and health status on costs. A Concentration of Health Expenses – Prescriptions Blog – NYTimes.com

GE introduces new MRI geared for larger patients GE Healthcare shows off latest MRI – The Business Review (Albany):

Obesity a risk for swine flu deaths Half of swine flu deaths in high-risk people -study | Reuters

August 18, 2009

Sleep apnea on increase Sleep Apnea Rises With Obesity, Boosts Deaths in Middle-Aged – Bloomberg.com; PLoS Medicine: Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Mortality: A Prospective Cohort Study

Push back on doctor’s campaign against obesity Anti-Obesity Dr. Jason Newsom Chomps Down on Dunkin’ Donuts « Vitals Spotlight – We Give the Doctor an Exam

August 11, 2009

President Obama calls for health insurance reform to cover obesity treatments, stating, “All I’m saying is let’s take the example of something like diabetes, one of — a disease that’s skyrocketing, partly because of obesity, partly because it’s not treated as effectively as it could be. Right now if we paid a family — if a family care physician works with his or her patient to help them lose weight, modify diet, monitors whether they’re taking their medications in a timely fashion, they might get reimbursed a pittance. But if that same diabetic ends up getting their foot amputated, that’s $30,000, $40,000, $50,000 — immediately the surgeon is reimbursed. Well, why not make sure that we’re also reimbursing the care that prevents the amputation, right? That will save us money. Text – Obama’s Health Care Town Hall in Portsmouth – NYTimes.com

August 10, 2009

Nominee for Surgeon General attacked over body weight Does it matter what the doctor weighs? — latimes.com

Arena preparing to submit new obesity drug to FDA San Diego Business Journal Online – business news for San Diego, California

August 7, 2009

Recession could worsen obesity prevalence Recession could have negative impact on obesity levels | News | Nursing Times

July 17, 2009

Minorities, blacks hardest hit by obesity reports CDC Atlanta health, diet and fitness news | ajc.com

July 16, 2009

AHA: severe obesity increases risks in surgery Severe obesity increases risks of health problems during surgery

AHA: Clarity on the overweight mortality confusion Mortality, Health Outcomes, and Body Mass Index in the Overweight Range: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association — Lewis et al. 119 (25): 3263 — Circulation

July 14, 2009

Excess weight speeds up osteoarthritis Excess Weight Speeds Up Osteoarthritis: MedlinePlus

July 14, 2009

RWJ releases report on taxes for sugar sweetened beverages Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Taxes and Public Health – RWJF

July 14, 2009 WHO addresses swine flu vaccine for persons with obesity. Swine Flu Vaccine Recommendations from World Health Organization – Health Blog – WSJ

July 10, 2009 CDC finds high prevalence of obesity in swine flu patients. Intensive-Care Patients With Severe Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection — Michigan, June 2009

July 2009 Study finds insulin resistance in overeating lean humans for the first time. Short-term overeating induces insulin resistance i…[Mol Med. 2009 Jul-Aug] – PubMed Result

July 10,2009

The economy, stress and overeating Job Stress, Economy Weighing on Americans: MedlinePlus

June 24, 2009

Obesity: Africa’s Next Big Killer Africa’s newest silent killer: obesity | FP Passport

July 2, 2009

Connecticut Governor Vetoes Labeling Bill

Rell rejects nutritional labeling for chain restaurants – The Connecticut Post Online

July 1, 2009

Obama Address Obesity in Town HallObama Addresses Health-Care Reform at Virtual Town Hall Meeting – washingtonpost.com

July 1, 2009

Trust for America’s Health releases “F as in Fat 2009” http://www.rwjf.org/files/research/20090701tfahfasinfat.pdf

June 30, 2009

Institute of Medicine Issues Report on Comparative Effectiveness Research

Initial National Priorities for Comparative Effectiveness Research – Institute of Medicine

Read Morgan Downey’s Testimony

http://www.iom.edu/Object.File/Master/64/740/Speaker%20Testimonies%203-4PM%20b

lock.pdf

June 30, 2009

Oregon enacts restaurant labeling bill AP Wire – Oregon | kgw.com | News for Portland Oregon and SW Washington

June 29, 2009

More Data on surgery for diabetes Weight-Loss Surgery May Be Beneficial for Diabetes – NYTimes.com

June 29, 2009

Kentucky phasing out sugar sweetened beverages Congress May Look to Ky. Schools’ Healthy Example in Creating Nutritional Policy – washingtonpost.com

June 25, 2009

IOM release workshop on Food Desserts The Public Health Effects of Food Deserts. Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine

May 28, 2009

IOM Releases report on Weight Gain in Pregnancy Report Brief. Weight Gain During Pregnancy: Reexamining the Guidelines – Institute of Medicine

May 9, 2009

Do obesity related diseases predispose to swine flu severity? Other Illness May Precede Worst Cases of Swine Flu – NYTimes.com

Archives

September 27th, 2009

APRIL 2009

April 24, 2009

After planting garden, Michelle Obama skips out to Five Guys for a burger.

First lady says she sneaks off to fun restaurants – washingtonpost.com

MARCH 2009

March 31, 2009

Kansas Governor Kathleen Sebelius lead off her testimony to the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee stating, “Yet, at the beginning of the 21st century, we face new and equally daunting challenges.

We face an obesity epidemic that threatens to make our children the first generation of Americanchildren to face life expectancies shorter than our own.”

March 30, 2009

Review of new drugs for obesity Obesity Drug by Arena Has an Effect, but a Limited One – NYTimes.com

March 27, 2009

New York Times reports on walking school buses in Italy fighting obesity and climate change

Students Give Up Wheels for Their Own Two Feet – NYTimes.com

March 18, 2009

Another study shows obesity increases risk of death

Obesity Takes Years Off Your Life – Forbes.com

March 13, 2009

Mississippi to cover state workers’ bariatric surgery

Surgery: Long-term care is more expensive | clarionledger.com | The Clarion-Ledger

March 9, 2009

Obama sets out Administration policy on use of science The White House – Press Office – Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies 3-9-09

March 6, 2009

Abdominal obesity adversely affects lung function Belly Fat Bad for Your Lungs?

March 6, 2009

New study finds dietician students prejudiced against persons with obesity Bias Against Obesity Is Found Among Future Dietitians – Forbes.com

March 1, 2009

Obesity increases worker’s comp. Obesity supersizing workers comp costs – Financial Week

March 1, 2009

South Carolina Senator criticized for trying to dump bicycle paths from stimulus bill. DC Bicycle Transportation Examiner: Sen. DeMint’s pro-obesity legislation was the real pork in the stimulus debate

FEBRUARY 2009

February 27, 2009

Obama budget to cut farm subsidies; improve child nutrition Obama wants to cut subsidies to farmers | DesMoinesRegister.com | The Des Moines Register

February 27, 2009

Drug maker buries data on diabetes drug causing weight gain AstraZeneca Documents Released in Seroquel Suit – NYTimes.com

February 20, 2009

North Carolina looks to penalize persons with obesity: Smoking, obesity may cost state employees | CharlotteObserver.com

February 19, 2009

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation announces national effort on childhood obesity Leading Research Funders Launch Collaborative To Accelerate Nation’s Progress in Reducing Childhood Obesity – RWJF

February 19, 2009

Clinton Foundation announces alliance on childhood obesity Alliance for a Healthier Generation Expands Efforts to Combat Childhood Obesity with Launch of Landmark Healthcare Initiative

February 18, 2009

Court of Appeals upholds NYC Calorie Disclosure Ordinance

http://www.citizen.org/documents/NYSRAOpinion.pdf

Court Upholds the City’s Rule Requiring Some Restaurants to Post Calorie Counts – NYTimes.com

CDC: Young Invincibles are obese CDC: ‘Young invincibles’ have significant health concerns – CNN.com

February 16, 2009:

Home recipes increase in calories: ‘Joy of Cooking’ or ‘Joy of Obesity’? – Los Angeles Times

February 12, 2009

CMS Issues decision on using bariatric surgery to treat Type 2 Diabetes; notes effectiveness of bariatric surgery in resolving Type 2 Diabetes. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Obesity linked to Birth Defects

Obesity During Pregnancy Linked to Infant Birth Defects – NYTimes.com

JAMA paper on birth defect risks with mothers with obesity. JAMA — Maternal Overweight and Obesity and the Risk of Congenital Anomalies: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis, February 11, 2009, Stothard et al. 301 (6): 636

February 19, 2009

Fast food restaurants predict strokes

More Fast-Food Joints in Neighborhoods Mean More Strokes – US News and World Report

February 12, 2009

How evolution lead to modern obesity

AAAS: Modern obesity epidemic can be traced back two million years – Telegraph

NEJM — Expanding Coverage for Children — The Democrats’ Power and SCHIP Reauthorization

JANUARY 2009

January 24, 2009

Childhood obesity influenced by genetic variations

Science Centric | News | Childhood obesity risk increased by newly-discovered genetic mutations

January 21, 2009

Obesity imperils health care reform

FEATURE-U.S. obesity epidemic shows perils to health reform – Forbes.com

January 20, 2009

Employers try incentives for healthier workforce Firms offer bigger incentives for healthy living – USATODAY.com

January 13, 2009

NIH launches study of how genes and environment affect children’s development National Children’s Study Begins Recruiting Volunteers, January 13, 2009 News Release – National Institutes of Health (NIH)

January 9, 2009

Physical Activity May not be Key to Obesity After All

Physical Activity May Not Be Key To Obesity Epidemic

January 6, 2009

Obesity and Ovarian Cancer Linked

Obesity Linked To Elevated Risk Of Ovarian Cancer

DECEMBER 2008

December 22, 2008

A little overweight and inactive hurts too

Even a Little Overweight, Inactivity Hurts the Heart – washingtonpost.com

December 19, 2008

Limiting snacks in schools can increase fruit, veggie consumption

Limiting School Snacks Boosts Fruit, Veggie Consumption – US News and World Report

December 18, 2008

Childhood Obesity may affect thyroid

Childhood Obesity May Cause Thyroid Problems – washingtonpost.com

December 16, 2008

New York Debates Tax on Soft Drinks

A Tax on Many Soft Drinks Sets Off a Spirited Debate – NYTimes.com

December 12, 2008

Study looks at relationship between obesity, breast cancer and frequency of mammography

Daily Cancer News – CancerConsultants.com

December 3, 2008

Visceral obesity linked to depression in elderly

Depression Linked to Increase in Abdominal Fat – US News and World Report