Posts Tagged ‘Health Care Costs’

D is For Disease, Death and Disability

July 8th, 2013

Supposed you woke up and the TV news and newspapers revealed that scientists had discovered a global threat affecting all races, both genders, reducing lifespans and causing millions of cases of disabilities, likely to cost billions of dollars a year. There was no clear cause and no treatment which seemed available, except, in some cases, surgically removing part of the GI track seemed to work…for a while.

What would you say? “Who cares”? “It’s their own fault”? “How much is this going to cost me?”  Perhaps, you would call your Congressional representative and Senator and demand a crash research program to find a cure? Or you could quibble for, say, forty years or so, over who is to blame and whether this “threat” is a condition, syndrome, risk factor or (God forbid!) a disease? Well, the latter is pretty much what we have been doing about obesity. Three new papers show the impact of obesity on mortality, disability and disability-related health care costs, reminding us of the toll this disease takes on the human body.

First, regarding mortality, a great number of studies have been published and the public is still confused. Now, Chang and colleagues, have published a paper in which they are able to predict life years lost associated with obesity-related diseases for non-smoking US adults. They found that obesity-related comorbidities are associated with large decreases in life years and increases in mortality rates. Years of life lost is more marked for younger than older adults, for blacks more than whites, for males than females and for more obese than less obese. Their study confirmed that being obese or underweight increased the risk of mortality. Furthermore, an obesity-related disease, such as coronary heart disease, hypertension, diabetes and stroke, increased the chances of dying and decreased life years by 0.2 to 11.7 years, depending on gender, race, BMI and age.  Obesity-related diseases were expected to shorten lifespan of people in their 20s by more than 5 years, while people in their 60s were predicted to lose just under one year of life. See, Chang SH, Pollack LM, Colditz, Life Years Lost Associated with Obesity-Related Diseases for U.S. Non-Smoking Adults.

Obesity-related diseases are also only partially understood. Type 2 diabetes and heart disease are commonly associated with obesity but there are a host of other conditions which are less well-known and appreciated. Among these are the disabling conditions associated with obesity. Brian S. Armour, et al, have looked at disability prevalence among persons who are obese. Of the 25.4% of US adults who are obese (53.4 million), 41.7% reported a disability in contrast to 26.7% of those at a healthy weight and 28.5% of those who were overweight. Movement difficulty was the most common type of basic action difficulty, affecting 32.5% of the adults with obesity. Of course, movement difficulties can hinder physical activity for weight loss.

Work limitations affected 16.6% of the adults with obesity. Visual difficulty was the common sensory difficulty at 11.5%, probably attributable to type 2 diabetes.  20.5% of adults with obesity reported complex activity limitation, compared to 12% of those at a healthy weight. All estimates for disability were significantly higher for people who were obese compared to those with a healthy weight. The prevalence of cognitive difficulty, contrary to Hank Cardello’s implications, was low at 3.6% for persons with obesity. However, persons at a healthy weight had higher cognitive difficulty than those who are overweight, 2.9% v. 2.4%. Armour BS, Courtney—Long EA, Campbell VA, Wethington HR, Disability Prevalence among health weight, overweight, and obese adults. Obesity, 2013 Apr.21 (4); 852-5.

Wayne L. Anderson, Joshua M. Weiner and colleagues widen the picture of persons who are obese with disabilities in terms of health care costs. Their new study estimates the additional average health care expenditures for overweight and obese adults with and without disabilities. They found that people with disabilities who were obese had almost three times the additional average costs of obesity compared to people without disabilities, $2,459 v. $889. Prescription drug costs were 3 times higher and outpatient expenditures were 74% higher. People with disabilities in the 45-64 year age group had the highest obesity expenditures. Overweight people with and without disabilities had lower expenditures than normal-weight people with and without disabilities. The authors note, “A substantial portion of people with disabilities are obese. People with disabilities are at higher risk of obesity because some conditions such as arthritis and diabetes are characterized by high levels of functional impairment. Arthritis can readily limit mobility, which may result in substantial weight gain over time. For diabetes, weight gain can be a byproduct of insulin use if patients do not effectively manage their weight. The coexistence of disability, obesity, and serious chronic conditions may result in very high health care expenditures.” Anderson WL, Wiener JM, Khatutsky G, Armour, BS Obesity and People with Disabilities: The Implications for Health Care Expenditures. Obesity, 2013 June 26, (epub ahead of print).

So, obesity is a driver of mortality and morbidity but is not a disease? Eh?

 

Staggering New Cost Projections for Obesity

November 22nd, 2011

Simulation model predicts increased health care costs and utilization in rising obese populations in the United States and the United Kingdom, predicting 65 million more obese in the US and 11 million more in the UK, meaning 6 to 8.5 million cases of diabetes, 5.7 to 7.3 million cases of heart disease, 492,000 to 669,000 additional cases of cancer in the US and UK combined. The combined health care costs increases are $48-66 billion per year in the US and by £1·9-2  billion  per year in the United Kingdom. Health and economic burden of the projected obesity t… [Lancet. 2011] – PubMed – NCBI

Time for Obesity in Health Care Reform

September 27th, 2009

January 30, 2009 :: By Morgan Downey

These are exciting times for health care reformers. We seem to have a President who is truly committed to reform of the health care system with the political strength to get his program enacted, at least a good part of it. What is the President’s program and how does or can, obesity be part of it?

First, some parts have already been enacted in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), aka the Stimulus Bill. Millions of federal dollars are starting to flow into (a) expanded Health Care Information Technology, (b) comparative-effectiveness research and (c) expanded research at the National Institutes of Health. In addition, President Obama and several of his key aides, such as Melody Barnes, Director of Domestic Policy Council, and Peter Orszag, director of Office of Management and Budget have both addressed obesity and its important role in reducing health care costs and increasing the nation’s health.

Second, a major component to be worked on this summer is providing health insurance to millions of Americans without health insurance.

How might these plans affect obesity?

Healthcare Information Technology (HIT) may provide some interesting opportunities. In a few places, extensive clinical databases are already in use which track patients receiving bariatric surgery. The Surgical Review Corporation, for one, has 100,000 surgical patients which are being tracked for long-term outcomes. The Geisinger Medical Center in central Pennsylvania also has extensive database on patients in surgical and medical treatment. Such clinical registries can provide a vast improvement in understanding obesity and its co-morbidities as well as tracking long-term improvements. Doing this in real time with real-world patients can add tremendous information to clinical trials, which, by their nature, have more restrictive populations and end-points. Last year, the National Committee on Quality Assurance (NCQA) expanded the widely used HEDIS system which measures quality in managed care plans to capture Body Mass Index (BMI) for adults and children. The Administration’s emphasis on electronic medical records (EMR) in primary care practice, by requiring capture of BMIs, along with other clinical indicators, such as blood pressure, cholesterol levels and lipids, can provide a tremendous database for researchers and has the potential to greatly improve patient care. But there is a third level as well. Private entities, such as Google and Microsoft, are developing Personal Health Records (PHR) for individuals to track their own information, which might include nutritional and exercise patterns. One can almost envision a system whereby food and exercise diaries, clinical indicators, pharmaceutical and surgical information is available for patients, health care professionals and researchers.

Of course, such systems take a lot of effort. Common terminology must be agreed to. Data has to be able to be verified. Systems have to interface and patient privacy has to be protected. Who owns this information is a critical issue.

Comparative effectiveness research has already received a great deal of funding under ARRA. The Institute of Medicine has a panel recommending research priorities and, given the discussion at a public meeting on March 20, 2009, there is good reason to anticipate that obesity will be one of the priorities. But the question should not be just what is the best way to lose weight. The research should look at weight loss by various interventions against standard treatments for a number of the co-morbid conditions associated with obesity. And, while there is good data on the efficacy of weight loss for resolution of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, less is know about its efficacy in mobility problems, such as knee and hip replacements, asthma or breast cancer.

Finally, the Obama Administration has an enormous opportunity in the coverage of the uninsured to make a real change for persons with obesity. First, the Administration should oppose using overweight or obesity as a pre-existing exclusion. While we do not know what percent of the uninsured population is overweight or obese, it is unlikely that the rate is any lower than the national averages. To exclude 30-60% of the uninsured population because of their weight would be poor policy indeed. Next, the Administration should provide a full range of interventions from counseling on nutrition and physical activity to pharmaceutical and surgical interventions. Not only would this directly address the source of many of the uninsured population’s health care problems, it could break the logjam of resistance to coverage of obesity prevention and treatment. While these two steps will be costly, we have seen the rising rates of health care costs and obesity go hand-in-hand. Economists today see obesity as a major contributor to chronic illness and its costs. Finally, coverage should be tied into electronic records which can track long term outcomes.

In the April 15, 2009 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, Johathan Q. Purnell and David R. Flum estimate that gastric bypass surgery could save 14, 310 diabetes-related deaths over five years. The evidence on the power of weight loss to prevent and improve chronic disease is there, if not yet perfect. The Administration has an opportunity to make a major leap forward in addressing obesity. It should not miss this chance.

A Diet for the New Administration

September 27th, 2009

December 30, 2008

By Morgan Downey

At this time of year, millions of Americans are hoping the new Administration will solve our seemingly intractable problems at home and abroad. Millions are also hoping to lose weight in the New Year. The two are not unrelated.

Over the past three decades, obesity has increased among all segments of the population, in the United States and abroad. Obesity is now recognized as the fuel behind many major health problems from cancer to diabetes to heart disease, and a significant cause of increasing health care utilization and health care costs.

While this recognition has increased among both Republicans and Democrats (for the first time, both parties recognized obesity in their 2008 party platforms), changing public policy has not caught up with the problem. Under President George W. Bush, Medicare did undo its policy that obesity was not a disease and did expand coverage of surgery for the treatment of obesity. There have been modest increases in the research and prevention budgets at the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But by and large, the efforts of the last eight years have been largely educational: tell people they should lose weight, eat more nutritiously, and exercise more.

Duh! We get it. And it doesn’t work. Frankly, other than bariatric surgery, nothing works very well to lose significant amounts for a long period of time. There simply is not one ‘fix’ that will reverse this disturbing trend.

So here is some advice to the incoming Administration. It should be noted that many appointees named so far have a solid exposure to obesity from a public policy perspective, including former Senator Tom Daschle, nominee for Secretary of Health and Human Services, Peter Orszag, named to head the Office of Management and Budget, Governor Bill Richardson, nominated for Secretary of Commerce, and Melody Barnes, incoming chief of domestic policy at the White House.

Universal health insurance is often put forward as the panacea for all ills. However, Democrats may have to learn that expanding health insurance coverage alone does not translate to a healthier population, especially if obesity continues to increase among children and adolescents. Truth be told, we do not have adequate medical interventions to affect the rates of obesity and its effects. So, if we do not know how to truly prevent obesity or create a long term treatment, what should a new Administration do? Basically, it should focus on how to create the conditions where it is more likely than not that we will find effective strategies for prevention and treatment in the future.

  1. Being a role model is not enough. It’s been noted that George Bush and Barack Obama share a passion for physical activity. Unfortunately, the habits of the chief executive do not translate to population changes. And then there is the smoking thing. Being a role model is not an excuse for inadequate policies.
  2. Make someone responsible for obesity policy development. Right now there is no one tasked at the upper levels of the U.S. Government with dealing with obesity. True, periodically the heads of different agencies give a speech, start a new website or create a new task force but little happens because so many do so little with scant coordination.
  3. Prepare to spend some money. For one of the most significant health problems in the country, the federal government spends vastly less than on obesity than other conditions. Research, prevention and treatment costs for diabetes and heart disease, to name but two, swamp comparable figures for obesity. The federal government is spending more on getting TV converters boxes in US homes than the entire NIH research budget on obesity.
  4. Do not just focus on childhood obesity. While childhood obesity is critical, remember that the population between 7 and 16 spans only 9 years out of a lifetime. Look at obesity over the lifetime and look for relevant interventions. Support childhood prevention programs but require that they have a competent evaluation method so we will know what is working and what is not.
  5. Do focus on research. Perhaps 90% of what we know about obesity has been learned since the discovery of leptin in 1994. Too many people believe that we know everything we need to know about obesity and do not need any more research. That’s not true. A great deal is known but there are many more questions than answers. Scientific credibility on issues around body weight is sorely needed. Every hour on television another weight loss program or product is hyped as being based on doctor’s advice or scientific study. What can help on both fronts is for the Administration to create a National Institute of Obesity Research at the National Institutes of Health. A new entity like this can reenergize researchers on obesity, can more closely coordinate the many disparate programs across NIH, provide leadership to other federal agencies, states and local governments and provide much needed focus on the social and economic impacts of obesity. Furthermore, a director who is articulate can help lead policymakers and the public away from harmful and dangerous products and keep a focus on developing effective interventions. The NIH bureaucracy will oppose “disease specific” research but their interests should not trump the public health needs and the best use of taxpayer dollars.
  6. As part of your health care reform package, remove the bias against drugs for weight loss in the Medicaid statute and change the exclusion of these drugs under Medicare Part D. Then have the Food and Drug Administration revisit its risk/benefit views of drugs to treat obesity. There are few fans of pharmaceutical companies in a Democratic Congress and Administration and there are even fewer who favor drugs to treat obesity. Nonetheless, there is a huge treatment gap. We have more and more effective surgical options, one over-the-counter FDA approved pill, a couple of tried medicines, commercial plans and self-help. What we do not have are the drug treatment options we have for high cholesterol, hypertension or diabetes. Recently, major pharmaceutical companies such as Merck, Pfizer, Solvay and Sanofi-Aventis have dropped or cut back on their programs to develop drugs for obesity. There are two reasons. First, insurance companies will not reimburse for most obesity treatments, including counseling, drugs and surgery. For the pharmaceutical industry, it just did not make economic sense to invest in drugs which were not going to be reimbursed. This is where leadership by Medicaid and Medicare is critical. If these programs support obesity products, private insurance may follow. This is in the government’s long term interest because insurers can avoid treating or preventing obesity knowing that the big effects, like diabetes and heart disease will not be seen until later in life, when Medicare will become the payor. Second, many involved in obesity drug development feel, rightly or wrongly, that the Food and Drug Administration is so risk-averse that they simply cannot afford the long and expensive trials necessary to meet the rising bar of safety. A National Institute of Obesity Research can help shape clinical trials needed by the FDA and speed the process along.
  7. Look to multiply your opportunities. For example, you can use the public works part of the economic stimulus package to construct new gyms in schools, sidewalks, playgrounds, green spaces and biking/walking trails to encourage more physical activity.
  8. Let the states experiment with taxes and proposals like displaying caloric content in restaurants. Vending machines, non-diet soft drinks, high-fat foods have all come under fire in recent years for contributing to the obesity epidemic. The problem is that these products still only contribute a fraction to an individual’s total caloric intake. But no one is sure that they won’t be replaced by other calories. Likewise, there will be voices to restrict food advertising to children through the federal government’s regulatory powers. Use your National Institute of Obesity Research to design evaluation studies so that there is an objective review to see if these policies will work.
  9. Take some leadership internationally. The United States has a long history of involvement in global health issues, such as HIV/AIDs. However, very little is done on the federal level to learn from other countries’ experiences and to help shape global patterns of eating and physical activity.
  10. Avoid the single fix ideas. The obesity field is full of good advice and scant evidence. Focusing on a single fix, such a TV advertising, agricultural subsidies or sweetened beverage may consume a great amount of political resources without producing the outcome you seek.

The obesity epidemic is more likely than not to continue to grow over the next four to eight years. However, the new Administration can position the United States for meaningful change if it takes its time and devotes attention to organizing the effort. With any luck, we can make future New Year’s resolutions more likely to be successful.

Downey Fact Sheet 3 – Costs

September 27th, 2009

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New analysis indicates costs attributed to obesity are estimated to be $147 billion per year. Annual Medical Spending Attributable To Obesity: P…[Health Aff (Millwood). 2009] – PubMed Result In 1998 the medical costs of obesity were estimated to be $78.5 billion, approximately half financed by Medicare or Medicaid.National Medical Spending Attributable To Overweight And Obesity: How Much, And Who’s Paying? — Finkelstein et al., 10.1377/hlthaff.w3.219 — Health Affairs.

Total health care expenditures of obese adults increased by more than 80% from 2001 to 2006.

During this time, the proportion of health care expenditures for obese adults increased from 28.1% of total health expenditures to 35.3%.

The mean annual health care expenditure for obese adults increased from $3,458 in 2001 to $5,148 in 2006. AHRQ News and Numbers: Health Care Spending for Obese U.S. Adults Rose More Than 80 Percent From 2001 to 2006

Total health care costs attributable to obesity/overweight are projected to double every decade, accounting for 16-18% of total US health care costs. Will all Americans become overweight or obese? Will all Americans become overweight or obese? est…[Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008] – PubMed Result compared to about 9% at present.

Elevated BMI levels in children is associated with $14.1 billion in additional prescription drug, emergency room and outpatient visit costs annually, indicating that the economic consequences of childhood obesity are probably much greater than previously indicated. The Impact of Obesity on Health Service Utilizatio…[Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009] – PubMed Result.

Latest News

September 27th, 2009

October 21, 2009

FDA plans revision to nutrition label. FDA seeks to improve nutrition labeling on food products – washingtonpost.com

October 20, 2009

Women with obesity at risk for in vitro fertilization failure The Press Association: Obesity cuts IVF success – study

October 19,2009

Can anyone get insurance? Now an underweight girl is excluded. Underweight Girl Denied Insurance Coverage – Denver News Story – KMGH Denver

October 18, 2009

Washington Post columnist Robin Givhan address the Fashion industry and thinness in the culture.Robin Givhan on Fashion: Size of the Model vs. Size of the Customer – washingtonpost.com

Great Idea: solve obesity by making people taller. Idea Lab – Should a War on Shortness Be One of the Goals of Health Care Reform? – NYTimes.com

October 17, 2009

NYT reports on prospects for new drugs for obesity Arena, Orexigen and Vivus Are Chasing an Effective Diet Drug – NYTimes.com

Why can’t CDC find obese swine flu patients? Pneumonia, Susceptibility of Young Among Traits of Swine Flu – washingtonpost.com

October 15, 2009             

Family Physicians Ink deal with Coke Family Doctors Sign Educational Deal With Coca-Cola – NPR Health Blog : NPR

October 14, 2009

First Lady Michelle Obama tackles childhood obesity Michelle Obama’s Weight Loss Tips: Watch TV Standing Up — Politics Daily

North Carolina Plan criticized Obesity penalty isn’t fair or effective – Columnists/Blogs – News & Observer

Ralph Lauren model fired for being too fat Photoshopped Ralph Lauren Model Filippa Hamilton Fired For Being Fat – WPIX

Dr. Bernandine Healy hits punitive steps against the obese The Obesity Epidemic Isn’t Just About Willpower – US News and World Report

October 13, 2009

Candidate’s weight becomes important issue in NJ Governor Race Is Chris Christie Too Fat to Be the Next Governor of New Jersey? – The Gaggle Blog – Newsweek.com

October 12, 2009

Infant denied health care for  pre-existing conditions Why we need health-care reform: ‘Obese’ infant denied insurance!

Colorado Insurer caves The Associated Press: Colo. insurer changes course on fat infants

Baby denied health insurance for obesity as pre-existing condition 17-Pound, 4-Month-Old Baby Denied Health Insurance for Being Too Fat – Children’s Health – FOXNews.com

October 9, 2009

Groups push back on premium increases in Senate Finance Bill If Your Waistline Grows, Should Your Premiums, Too? – Prescriptions Blog – NYTimes.com

October 8, 2009

Corzine attacked as bigot Is Corzine A Bigot? | The New Republic

October 7, 2009

Physicians lead the way in treating obesity Doctors join fight against obesity – USATODAY.com

NJ Governor Corzine accused of attacking opponents weight Corzine Points Spotlight at Christie’s Weight – NYTimes.com

North Carolina to punish overweight state workers North Carolina state health plan to penalize smokers, obese

October 6, 2009

Study showing restaurant calorie labeling doesn’t change habits sure to add fuel to labeling debate Calorie Postings Don’t Change Habits, Study Finds – NYTimes.com

October 2, 2009,

New York Board of Education bans bake sales Bake Sales Are Banned in New York Schools – NYTimes.com

October 1, 2009

After 20 years USDA program for Women Infants and Children adds fruits and vegetables to its voucher program WIC nutrition program expands to cover fruits, vegetables — latimes.com

September 17, 2009 NEJM publishes study on taxing sugar-sweetened beverages NEJM — The Public Health and Economic Benefits of Taxing Sugar-Sweetened Beverages

September 11, 2009

Indiana Court allows workers comp coverage of bariatric surgery Indiana Appeals Court Affirms Work Comp Coverage for Obesity Surgery

September 9, 2009

STOP Obesity Alliance presents health care reform proposals Curbing Obesity Epidemic Key to Health Care Reform: Experts – US News and World Report See 16th and 17th U.S. Surgeons General, STOP Obesity Alliance Announce America has Reached Tipping Point on Obesity, Call for Direct Action – STOP Obesity Alliance

September 1, 2009

Institute of Medicine issues recommendations for combating childhood obesity Report maps out solutions to child obesity – USATODAY.com

USDA announces child nutrition grants Release No. 0416.09

More employers trying financial incentives As Federal Healthcare Reform Debate Continues, New Survey Reveals More Companies Turn to Financial Rewards to Tackle Soaring Employee Healthcare Costs

August 31, 2009

New target for therapies identified Study may lead to new obesity therapies – UPI.com

New York City targets sugar-sweetened drinks New Salvo in City’s War on Sugary Drinks – City Room Blog – NYTimes.com

Risk of infant mortality rises with mother’s weight Mom’s obesity tied to higher infant mortality

August 30, 2009

Obesity linked to swine flu deaths Obesity linked to swine flu deaths | World news | The Observer

August 27, 2009

Extreme obesity shortens lives by 12 years Extreme obesity can shorten people’s lives by 12 years – USATODAY.com

New drug claims ability to fight obesity and diabetes New fat-fighting drug has anti-diabetes action too | Health | Reuters

Obesity deniers come out http://www.newsweek.com/id/213807

August 24, 2009

American Heart Association raises alarm about sugar Heart Association recommends limits on added sugars – White Coat Notes – Boston.com

Interesting graph plots out contribution of obesity, age and health status on costs. A Concentration of Health Expenses – Prescriptions Blog – NYTimes.com

GE introduces new MRI geared for larger patients GE Healthcare shows off latest MRI – The Business Review (Albany):

Obesity a risk for swine flu deaths Half of swine flu deaths in high-risk people -study | Reuters

August 18, 2009

Sleep apnea on increase Sleep Apnea Rises With Obesity, Boosts Deaths in Middle-Aged – Bloomberg.com; PLoS Medicine: Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Mortality: A Prospective Cohort Study

Push back on doctor’s campaign against obesity Anti-Obesity Dr. Jason Newsom Chomps Down on Dunkin’ Donuts « Vitals Spotlight – We Give the Doctor an Exam

August 11, 2009

President Obama calls for health insurance reform to cover obesity treatments, stating, “All I’m saying is let’s take the example of something like diabetes, one of — a disease that’s skyrocketing, partly because of obesity, partly because it’s not treated as effectively as it could be. Right now if we paid a family — if a family care physician works with his or her patient to help them lose weight, modify diet, monitors whether they’re taking their medications in a timely fashion, they might get reimbursed a pittance. But if that same diabetic ends up getting their foot amputated, that’s $30,000, $40,000, $50,000 — immediately the surgeon is reimbursed. Well, why not make sure that we’re also reimbursing the care that prevents the amputation, right? That will save us money. Text – Obama’s Health Care Town Hall in Portsmouth – NYTimes.com

August 10, 2009

Nominee for Surgeon General attacked over body weight Does it matter what the doctor weighs? — latimes.com

Arena preparing to submit new obesity drug to FDA San Diego Business Journal Online – business news for San Diego, California

August 7, 2009

Recession could worsen obesity prevalence Recession could have negative impact on obesity levels | News | Nursing Times

July 17, 2009

Minorities, blacks hardest hit by obesity reports CDC Atlanta health, diet and fitness news | ajc.com

July 16, 2009

AHA: severe obesity increases risks in surgery Severe obesity increases risks of health problems during surgery

AHA: Clarity on the overweight mortality confusion Mortality, Health Outcomes, and Body Mass Index in the Overweight Range: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association — Lewis et al. 119 (25): 3263 — Circulation

July 14, 2009

Excess weight speeds up osteoarthritis Excess Weight Speeds Up Osteoarthritis: MedlinePlus

July 14, 2009

RWJ releases report on taxes for sugar sweetened beverages Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Taxes and Public Health – RWJF

July 14, 2009 WHO addresses swine flu vaccine for persons with obesity. Swine Flu Vaccine Recommendations from World Health Organization – Health Blog – WSJ

July 10, 2009 CDC finds high prevalence of obesity in swine flu patients. Intensive-Care Patients With Severe Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection — Michigan, June 2009

July 2009 Study finds insulin resistance in overeating lean humans for the first time. Short-term overeating induces insulin resistance i…[Mol Med. 2009 Jul-Aug] – PubMed Result

July 10,2009

The economy, stress and overeating Job Stress, Economy Weighing on Americans: MedlinePlus

June 24, 2009

Obesity: Africa’s Next Big Killer Africa’s newest silent killer: obesity | FP Passport

July 2, 2009

Connecticut Governor Vetoes Labeling Bill

Rell rejects nutritional labeling for chain restaurants – The Connecticut Post Online

July 1, 2009

Obama Address Obesity in Town HallObama Addresses Health-Care Reform at Virtual Town Hall Meeting – washingtonpost.com

July 1, 2009

Trust for America’s Health releases “F as in Fat 2009” http://www.rwjf.org/files/research/20090701tfahfasinfat.pdf

June 30, 2009

Institute of Medicine Issues Report on Comparative Effectiveness Research

Initial National Priorities for Comparative Effectiveness Research – Institute of Medicine

Read Morgan Downey’s Testimony

http://www.iom.edu/Object.File/Master/64/740/Speaker%20Testimonies%203-4PM%20b

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June 30, 2009

Oregon enacts restaurant labeling bill AP Wire – Oregon | kgw.com | News for Portland Oregon and SW Washington

June 29, 2009

More Data on surgery for diabetes Weight-Loss Surgery May Be Beneficial for Diabetes – NYTimes.com

June 29, 2009

Kentucky phasing out sugar sweetened beverages Congress May Look to Ky. Schools’ Healthy Example in Creating Nutritional Policy – washingtonpost.com

June 25, 2009

IOM release workshop on Food Desserts The Public Health Effects of Food Deserts. Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine

May 28, 2009

IOM Releases report on Weight Gain in Pregnancy Report Brief. Weight Gain During Pregnancy: Reexamining the Guidelines – Institute of Medicine

May 9, 2009

Do obesity related diseases predispose to swine flu severity? Other Illness May Precede Worst Cases of Swine Flu – NYTimes.com