Posts Tagged ‘intensive behavioral counseling’

Cancer and Obesity Explored

November 3rd, 2011

The Institute of Medicine’s National Cancer Policy Forum this week convened a two-day workshop, “The Role of Obesity in Cancer Survival and Recurrance.” So this is a good opportunity to re-visit the relationship between these two deadly diseases. Susan Gapstur of the American Cancer Society noted the growing list of cancers associated with obesity. For men, these include cancers of the colon, esophagus, kidney, colorectum, pancreas, gallbladder and liver. Women are affected by the same cancers as well as of the endometrium and postmenopausal breast cancer. Evidence is accumulating for an association with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, ovarian cancer in women and aggressive prostate in men. Obesity, she pointed out, is not the second (to tobacco) leading risk factor of cancer. Ominously, she pointed out we do not know what the health effects will be for the children now obesity who will obese for a lifetime.

Pamela J. Goodwin of the University of Toronto explored potential mechanisms in the progression to cancer including inflammation, adipokines, hyperinsulinemia, diabetes/diabetes drugs and sex steroids. She pointed to studies showing reductions in cancer risk with intentional weight loss of 20 pounds or more. Intentional weight loss and in… [Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2003] – PubMed – NCBI and reduction in the relative risks of death and of cancer following bariatric surgery. Metabolic surgery and cancer: protective effects of b… [Cancer. 2011] – PubMed – NCBI.  Specifically, she showed the positive effect of intentional weight loss on breast cancer risk   Does intentional weight loss reduce canc… [Diabetes Obes Metab. 2011] – PubMed – NCBI and the impact of physical activity on improvements in insulin in breast cancer survivors Impact of a mixed strength and endurance exerci… [J Clin Oncol. 2008] – PubMed – NCBI.

Bruce Wolfe of the Oregon and Science University and a bariatric surgeon reminded the participants that the Swedish Obesity Study found the reduction in mortality after bariatric surgery was greater for cancer than for cardiovascular events Effects of bariatric surgery on mortality in Sw… [N Engl J Med. 2007] – PubMed – NCBI. In a Utah study, bariatric surgery reduced deaths from cancer by 60% compared to a 48% reduction in cardiovascular events. Long-term mortality after gastric bypass surgery. [N Engl J Med. 2007] – PubMed – NCBI

Rachel Ballard-Barbash of the National Cancer Institute, who has been a leader in exploring the obesity-cancer connection for many years, moved the discussion to look at the co-morbid conditions of obesity and their relationship to cancer mortality, including renal disease, congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, citing A refined comorbidity measurement algorithm fo… [Ann Epidemiol. 2007] – PubMed – NCBI

Patricia Ganz of the UCLA Schools of Medicine picked up the point and explained that about half of all deaths of breast cancer survivors are due to causes other than breast cancer. She recommended prevention of weight gain and/or weight loss in those breast cancer survivors who are obese. 

Thomas Wadden described the non-surgical approaches to weight loss used in the Diabetes Prevention Program and the LOOK Ahead study and the contribution of intensive behavioral counseling to reduction in comorbid conditions associated with obesity

Some of the workshop’s presentations are on-line at Workshop on the Role of Obesity in Cancer Survival and Recurrence – Institute of Medicine. Watch that site for future information on a publication from the workshop.

New Support for Medicare Coverage of Intensive Counseling for Obesity

October 5th, 2011

If the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services needed any more support today for including intensive behavioral counseling for obesity as a covered service, it received it today from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF.)  The USPSTF today released an update of its 2003 recommendation, which was the basis for the Medicare proposal. The update review of literature clearly supports the value of intensive behavioral counseling. It concludes:

  1. Behaviorally based treatment resulted in 6.6 lb greater weight loss in intervention than control participants after 12-18 months, with more treatment sessions associated with greater loss.

  2. Controls generally lost little or no weight, whereas intervention groups lost an average of 4% of baseline weight.

  3. Weight-loss treatment reduced diabetes incidence in patients with pre-diabetes.

  4. Effects on lipids and blood pressure were mixed and small.

The update is published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Effectiveness of primary care-relevant treatm… [Ann Intern Med. 2011] – PubMed – NCBI

Medicare Urged to cover Intensive Counseling

September 28th, 2011

As we announced before, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is evaluating   including intensive behavioral counseling for adults with obesity as a Medicare benefit. Below are comments we just filed with Medicare. (The comment period closes September 30, 2011)  Readers still have time to submit their own comments.

Sarah McClain, MHS
Lead Analyst
Coverage and
Analysis Group
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
Mail Stop C1-09-06
7500 Security Boulevard
Baltimore, Maryland 21244-1850
 

Dear Ms. McClain,

 The proposed coverage of intensive behavioral counseling of adults for obesity is both indicated by its endorsement by the United States Preventive Services Task Force , subsequent literature, and two studies published in the last month.

 

The Look AHEAD study has focused on the benefits of lifestyle changes to achieve weight loss in overweight/obese participants with type 2 diabetes. The study population which received intensive lifestyle intervention (such as that contained in the proposed decision memorandum) obtained superior results to those receiving usual care (diabetes support and education.) At year 4, there was a 4.7% reduction from initial weight in the intensive lifestyle group compared to 1.1% in the usual care group. 46% of the intensive lifestyle group lost more than 5% of initial weight and 23% lost more than 10%. (The usual care group saw 25% lose more than 5% and 10% lose more than 10%.) 

As these results would predict, the intensive lifestyle group had significantly greater improvements in glycemic control and several markers of cardiovascular disease risk.  

As with the Diabetes Prevention Program, the study’s oldest participants, 65-74 years of age, lost significantly more weight than younger counterparts at all 4 years, and reported lower daily caloric intake, higher physical activity and overall greater adherence to the behavioral program. (Wadden TA, Neiberg RH, Wing RR, et al, Four-Year Weight Losses in the Look AHEAD Study: Factors Associated with Long-Term Success, Obesity (2011) 19;10: 1987-1996.) 

Thus, it appears that Medicare could ‘look ahead’ with some confidence that the proposed benefit can result in immediate health improvements to Medicare beneficiaries.

 

These health improvements can be economically quantified, although that is not necessary for the purposes of National Coverage Determinations. Recently, Dr. Kenneth Thorpe reported that a 10% reduction in weight in persons with obesity  age 60-64 could provide Medicare with savings of $1.8 to $2.3 billion over ten years and even more if overweight pre-diabetic adults were included. (Thorpe KE, Yang Z, Enrolling people with prediabetes ages 60-64 in proven weight loss program could save Medicare $7 billion or more. Health Affairs 2011 Sep; 30(9):1673-9)  While the study participants did not achieve the 10% criteria, their remarkable results indicate a significant cost saving to the Medicare program could be achieved.

For these reasons, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services should not only implement the proposed decision memorandum for Medicare beneficiaries but to explore ways in which such intensive behavioral counseling for obesity may be utilized by as many obese beneficiaries as possible. This would include a two-prong educational campaign. The first prong would be directed to the appropriate health care professionals to make them aware of the benefit and how to achieve competency in intensive behavioral counseling. The other prong would be directed at Medicare beneficiaries to make them aware of the new benefit and possibilities of successful weight management.

 

 Sincerely,

Morgan Downey,

Editor & Publisher, Downey Obesity Report

Washington, D.C.

 

Medicare Moving to Expand Obesity Coverage

September 5th, 2011

Medicare is continuing to push for coverage of intensive behavioral counseling of adults for obesity. You can follow their activity and read the proposed decision memo at the link the below. Public comments are open until September 30, 2011 National Coverage Analysis (NCA) Tracking Sheet for Intensive Behavioral Therapy for Obesity (CAG-00423N)

Medicare Weighs Behavioral Counseling

May 6th, 2011

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is considering adding intensive behavioral counseling of adults for obesity as a Medicare benefit as recommended by the United States Preventive Services Task Force.  See the public comments at National Coverage Analysis (NCA) for Intensive Behavioral Therapy for Obesity (CAG-00423N) If you scroll down to “ Jennifer Leonard” you will see the comments from the STOP Obesity Alliance.