Posts Tagged ‘soda ban’

NYC Ban on Beverage Cups Crushed

June 27th, 2014

The New York State Court of Appeals has affirmed lower court decisions banning the sale of sugar sweetened beverages in cups over 16 ounces capacity. The Court of Appeals decision, as was the case in the lower courts, focused on the power of the New York City Board of Health to make several policy decisions in this area when the New York City Council and the New York State Legislature had not acted in this area.

Predictably, some activists pointed to the money employed to fight the City’s regulation. They miss the point. This regulation was bad policy at the outset. Those who think obesity is the result of “One Thing” are always disappointed when it turns out that changing the “One Thing” does not affect the accumulation of excess body fat. In addition, the regulation had numerous inconsistencies. It suffered from “over-inclusion” because it affected everyone buying a beverage in New York City and from “under-inclusive” in that other beverages of same or greater caloric content were not covered.

No doubt those who believe in the value of restricting marketing of food items will be back at work trying to find a way to work around  this decision. These advocates need to keep in mind that the Supreme Court (and other courts) have set a very high bar on legislative restrictions on marketing. These cases are based on First Amendment  (which was not even touched in the New York City case) to arbitrary restrictions on commercial practices. Restricting or banning advertising of food to children is a frequent mantra in prevention-of-obesity circles. The Supreme Court is pretty clear that such restrictions are not likely to be upheld.

 

NYC ban on large soda cups unconstitutional

July 31st, 2013

New York State Supreme Court Appellate Division has held that the New York City’s ban on the sale of sugar sweetened beverages in cups over 16 ounces unconstitutional, upholding a lower court decision. The ruling held that sugar-sweetened beverages were not inherently a health risk, only when not taken in moderation. It found the New York City ban, which applied to some food outlets and not to others and to some sweetened beverages, but not others, exceeded the Board of Health’s authority. The rule covered non-diet soft drinks, sweetened teas, sweetened black coffee, hot chocolate, energy drinks, sport drinks and sweetened juices. It did not cover alcoholic drinks, milkshakes, fruit smoothies, mixed coffee drinks, mochas, lattes and 100% fruit juices. It applied to delis, fast-food franchises, movie theaters, stadiums and street carts but not to grocery stores, convenience stores, bodegas, gas stations and other similar businesses.

The appeals court found that the NYC ban violated all four factors indicative of usurpation of legislative functions. They noted that the NYC ban was not an all-encompassing regulation but included numerous economic and social policy decisions, reserved to the legislature.

The appeals court did not address the issue of whether such a ban was an unconstitutional restriction on personal liberty.

While the appeals court relied on New York State law, it is worth noting that federal constitutional law, especially the First Amendment, as interpreted by the Supreme Court, contains a very high bar to regulations which provide such loopholes and exceptions. See, The Supreme Court and the Future of Obesity Policies. Obesity advocates need to be much more aware of the limits of policy-making in this area. The risk that some policies will be over-inclusive, on the one hand, but under-inclusive in other ways, will make for difficult law and adverse decisions, such as this one.

Mayor Bloomberg is serving his last term and his tenure will be noted for its commitment to improving the health of New Yorkers. Hopefully, he will spare us another petulant moment after the first court rejected the cup size ban, when on the David Letterman Show, he pleaded (with whom?) “As long as you don’t to ban ‘Cheezits’. ‘Cheezits’ are ok.”

I hope the next Mayor of New York, or any public official understands obesity is tougher than you think. See, Note to Mayor Bloomberg: It’s Harder Than You Think, September, 2102.